PFAS and the Camas Water System

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**Update 5/21/24**

Information for Drinking Water Customers Regarding the City’s PFAS Response

This information is being provided to City of Camas, WA water system customers to inform you of the City’s ongoing response to per- and polyfluoroalkyl substances (PFAS) within portions of the City’s groundwater sources (i.e. wells).

Status of Well 13

In accordance with the Washington State Department of Health (DOH) requirements the City first notified customers in January of 2023 that one of the City’s ten well sources, Well 13, had PFAS detections that were slightly above the “State Action Level” (SAL). There was an average detection level of 15.8ppt and the SAL is 15 ppt. Since that time, the City has provided multiple notices to the public through various sources that Well 13 has been used seasonally as needed to meet water demands. Most recently, a social media/website announcement was made that Well 13 was turned on again on May 15th as a cautionary measure after two of the City’s other wells had to be taken offline for mechanical service. The two wells are being repaired as quickly as possible, and in the meantime, Well 13 will only be used if the water demands get high enough that the City’s other remaining wells are not able to keep up. However, with the summer months nearly here, we also want our customers to understand that Well 13 will remain on and likely be used as a regular water source from June 1 through Fall 2024 when demands are less, at which time it would be turned off again through the winter.

You can help! Reducing your irrigation use to every other day (e.g. odd/even based on the last number of your address), or using native plantings and not irrigating at all, can minimize the need for the use of Well 13.

City’s PFAS Response Plan & New EPA Rule

In 2021, the Washington State Board of Health (SBOH) adopted a rule that required water system utilities, including the City of Camas, to test for PFAS. PFAS are a newer class of contaminants, that at the time, were not regulated by the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA). As discussed above, the rule also requires the City to notify you if any test results exceed the SAL.

The City has taken the PFAS concern seriously and continues to be proactive in our approach to the water system. After volunteering in late 2020 to test our water system for PFAS prior to most other providers in the State, the City has been actively researching, sampling, monitoring and reviewing options with the City Council to help address PFAS within the City’s system on both a near-term and long-term basis. Most immediately, the City is currently designing treatment system improvements for Well 13, which will likely include the use of either granular activated carbon or ion exchange treatment media. Treatment for Well 13 is anticipated to be online in late 2025, and based on early estimates is anticipated to cost approximately $6,500,000.

In addition to designing treatment for Well 13, the City’s team of experts are also assisting the City with completion of a comprehensive PFAS response management plan which will include a comprehensive review of the City’s well sources and identification of all potential funding resources for future treatment or new water sources. We received some additional help towards this effort in April when the Nation finally received certainty regarding our target PFAS treatment levels from the EPA.

Exposure to PFAS occurs in various ways, including through drinking water. Because of the widespread use of PFAS in manufacturing, it has become a world-wide issue and one that until very recently, even the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) or Safe Water Drinking Act did not address or provide guidance for the States or water providers to follow. On April 10, 2024, EPA announced their final National Primary Drinking Water Regulation (NPDWR) for six specific PFAS. This included development of a Maximum Contaminant Level (MCL) for PFOA, PFAS, PFHxS HFPO-DA and PFBS. EPA also finalized health-based, non-enforceable Maximum Contaminant Level Goals (MCLGs) for these same PFAS. The regulated MCLs and MCLGs are shown in the table below.

The final PFAS NPDWR Rule requires:

  • Public water systems must monitor for these PFAS and have three years to complete initial monitoring (by 2027), followed by ongoing compliance monitoring. Water systems must also provide the public with information on the levels of these PFAS in their drinking water beginning in 2027.
  • Public water systems have five years (by 2029) to implement solutions that reduce these PFAS if monitoring shows that drinking water levels exceed these MCLs.
  • Beginning in five years (2029), public water systems that have PFAS in drinking water which violates one or more of these MCLs must take action to reduce levels of these PFAS in their drinking water and must provide notification to the public of the violation.

The NPDWR provides States an additional 2 years to create and adopt individual state regulations to be in compliance with the NPDWR. It is expected that DOH will adopt similar levels to EPA for utilities in Washington State. The City’s monitoring completed in 2021 and 2022 should count towards meeting the requirements in the first bullet and we are already moving on treatment options for Well 13. Even though the City’s other sources have been testing below the State Action Level of 15 ppt; unfortunately, based on prior PFOS test results greater than 4.0 ppt it appears that other City wells may now need additional monitoring under EPAs MCL. As such, as part of the City’s response management plan we will be monitoring all wells and investigating further to determine if additional treatment or alternative sources are needed to meet the new MCL.

This is of the highest priority for the City’s water system, and we are working as quickly as possible to get treatment in place and have a solid response management plan as a roadmap for the future.

The standards established by EPA are set to reduce PFAS to the lowest levels that are feasible for effective implementation. If you are concerned about the level of PFAS in your drinking water, consider installing an in-home water treatment (e.g., filters) that are certified to lower the levels of PFAS in your water. For more information: https://www.epa.gov/system/files/documents/2024-04/water-filter-fact-sheet.pdf

For fact sheets and more information on the new EPA National Primary Drinking Water regulation related to PFAS, please visit: https://www.epa.gov/sdwa/and-polyfluoroalkyl-substances-pfas

For more information related to the City’s water system and PFAS, please visit https://engagecamas.com/pfas-and-the-camas-water-system or contact Rob Charles, Utilities Manager (360-817-7003 or rcharles@cityofcamas.us) or Steve Wall, Public Works Director (360-817-7899 or swall@cityofcamas.us). Please do not hesitate to share this notice with others who may drink this water, especially those who may not have received this notice directly (for example, people in apartments and businesses).

We have also completed the 2023 Consumer Confidence Report, which you can find here: https://engagecamas.com/21559/widgets/70670/documents/55218

**Update 4/12/24**

You may or may not have heard the recent news regarding the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) publishing their new rules on Per- and Polyfluoroalkyl Substances (PFAS) levels in drinking water. The rule, established under the Safe Drinking Water Act, will help reduce exposure to PFAS for approximately 100 million people nationwide. However, it is widely recognized the new rule and regulations will pose a significant challenge to water providers.

The good news is that the City of Camas has been preparing for this ruling, and feel we are as prepared as possible, given the dynamics of the PFAS conversation at a state and national level. We have a team in place, we have solid sampling and monitoring results, we’re just beginning work on development of a management plan, we’re getting a better handle on potential funding resources – and we finally have certainty regarding our target treatment levels and what EPA deems to be “safe drinking water.”

We will provide more information as the State, our regional partners and staff begin to understand the ruling better. We’ll also be working to get an initial notice out to the public that reiterates where Camas is at in our overall process and where we’re headed. In the meantime, please visit these links to learn more information about the recent EPA Ruling. https://www.epa.gov/newsreleases/biden-harris-administration-finalizes-first-ever-national-drinking-water-standard https://doh.wa.gov/newsroom/washington-state-will-move-forward-adopt-us-environmental-protection-agencys-new-federal-regulation

**Updated 12/27/23**

Water System Plan (WSP) Amendment for PFAS - The City is in the process of amending the WSP to add language about PFAS testing requirements by the Washington State Department of Health (DOH) and EPA for sources that test above the State Action Level (SAL) and proposed EPA Maximum Contaminant Level (MCL). A high-level risk assessment and PFAS screening to guide the City on immediate and near term mitigation actions for reducing PFAS from well sources will be included. Mitigation measures will include treatment options and capital and operations and maintenance costs for impacted sources. The amendment will allow the City to apply for state and federal grants related to PFAS design and construction.

PFAS Evaluation and Well 13 Treatment Design - The City is in the process of selecting a consultant team to complete a more in-depth risk assessment for the City’s water sources and look at possible sources of PFAS contamination in the city’s groundwater supply. The assessment will aid the City in determining potential mitigation measures including options such as treatment of current sources or the potential need to look for new water sources in different areas. Also included in this effort will be design of a treatment system specifically for Well 13 that can be used to obtain contractor bids to construct the project. The City expects the consultant team to be on board by February 2024 and the City is requesting that the selected team move as fast as possible in completing the work.

PFAS Lawsuit Information - Various PFAS manufacturers were sued in a class-action lawsuit brought on behalf of water systems across the Country. Recently, the federal court in South Carolina, where the cases and settlements are being handled, approved multi-billion dollar settlements involving two of the largest producers of PFAS chemicals: 3M and DuPont. These settlements resolve claims for PFAS contamination specifically against 3M and Dupont in water systems, but there may be additional settlements against other producers in the future. The 3M and Dupont settlements are structured so that every eligible water system in the Country is automatically included as a “class member” in the case unless the water system submits a formal “opt out” request to the court. In 2023, the City of Camas elected to be represented by one of the primary legal firms litigating the case and participating in the settlement negotiations and has continued to maintain our status of a Class Member. Some of the additional testing and monitoring shown on our EngageCamas site was completed in coordination with the class-action lawsuit. The level of PFAS in Camas’ water system is extremely low compared to many other systems throughout the Country, which will likely mean our share of the overall settlement will be relatively less; however, we expect the funds from the settlement will be a sizable contribution towards future PFAS treatment needs.

**Updated 10/10/23**

Well 13 has now been shut off for the season. We will inform the public if/when Well 13 is active once again.

FAQ -Is our water safe to drink and bathe in?

The low levels of PFAS found in our water supply are slightly above recommended limits in state and federal guidance. According to DOH, if you have been drinking water with PFAS above a state action level (SAL), that does not mean you will get sick or have health problems. If you are concerned about potential health impacts from exposure to PFAS, please contact your health provider. Because the water supply at each home is a combination of water from a variety of wells, we are currently unable to provide information on which areas of the City may have detectable levels of PFAS in your tap water. However, the City is completing additional testing throughout the system and will continue to update our information page with test results so you are able to make informed decisions. Please feel free to check back regularly. For more FAQs please visit https://engagecamas.com/21559/widgets/70670/documents/46966

PFAS and the Camas Water Supply

The City has been working hard to stay on top of the emerging and technically complex perfluoroalkyl substances (PFAS) contamination issue. We have been listening to the public’s input and questions and want to assure everyone that providing safe and effective services – of all types - to our customers is our highest priority.

Many of us at the City live in this community and use the same source of water every day. We’re aware this is an uncomfortable topic for many as there is still a lot that is unknown by the experts. Resident health is paramount, and we are being proactive on this topic. We’re working to understand both the current situation that recent State regulations and testing of the system have brought to light, and any potential future impacts to our water.

PFAS in general, and the potential impacts to water sources is an ever-evolving discussion. Additionally, as with every project or expense the City takes on, we want to take prudent, measured actions that use your money wisely, while also working to leverage state and Federal sources when possible.

We have provided an FAQ, which we will update periodically, to help answer some of the questions you may have. In addition, we have provided links to outside sources that have more information on PFAS. Finally, you can ask us questions below. Please note, it may take staff a few business days to respond, but we will respond! Additionally, some questions may be answered in private depending on the nature of the question and whether or not a similar response has already been provided in regards to another question!

Current Progress:

Evaluating Options. We continue talking with Department of Health officials and experts in the industry to review potential treatment options. Likewise, we continue evaluating the potential need for additional or different sources and ways to potentially limit the amount of water with known PFAS concentrations that is sent to our customers.

Tracking Nation-Wide Discussions. PFAS is an extremely complex and ever-evolving topic. Experts around the Nation and world continue investigating potential sources of PFAS and potential impacts to public health and the environment. Additionally, the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) is still deliberating on a potential new Nation-wide rule that will set new standards for PFAS in drinking water - it is vital we understand and monitor this closely as we look to the future!

Using the Public's Funds Wisely. The City is tracking potential State and Federal Grant opportunities to assist with the PFAS process. The City also has legal representation to assist with the many potential settlements against the companies that manufacture and used PFAS in their products that have since impacted water sources throughout the world.

Sampling and Monitoring the System. We are working hard to determine the extent of PFAS in the Water System! Testing is ongoing not only at our Well Sites, but also throughout the City to determine the extent of PFAS that may or may not be reaching our customers. See below for the most up to date information regarding testing and results.

*Please note, the City tests for numerous Perfluorinated Compounds that fall under PFAS, we will only show results that are detectable.








City Well No.
DOH Source No.Testing Date
PFAS Measured
Result
State Action Level (SAL)
Result
Well 5
(Last used August 2022)
063/22/2022(PFOS) PFoctane Sulfonic acid 6.9ng/L15ng/L
PFAS Detected: Lower than State Action Level (SAL)
(PFOA) PFoctanoic acid
3.6ng/L
10ng/L
PFAS Detected: Lower than State Action Level (SAL)
(PFBS) PFbutane Sulfonic acid
3.7ng/L
345ng/L
PFAS Detected: Lower than State Action Level (SAL)
8/5/2022
(PFOS) PFoctane sulfonic acid
7.3ng/L
15ng/L
PFAS Detected: Lower than State Action Level (SAL)
(PFOA) PFoctanoic acid
5.4ng/L
10ng/L
PFAS Detected: Lower than State Action Level (SAL)
(PFBS) PFbutane sulfonic acid
3.5ng/L
345ng/L
PFAS Detected: Lower than State Action Level (SAL)
(PFBA) PFbutanoic acid
2.2ng/L
None
PFAS Detected: Lower than State Action Level (SAL)
11/9/2022(PFBA) PFbutanoic acid
6.9ng/L
15ng/L
PFAS Detected: Lower than State Action Level (SAL)
(PFOA) PFoctanoic acid
5.3ng/L
10ng/L
PFAS Detected: Lower than State Action Level (SAL)
(PFBS) PFbutane sulfonic acid
3.9ng/L
345ng/L
PFAS Detected: Lower than State Action Level (SAL)
(PFPeA) PFpentanoic acid
2.7ng/L
None
PFAS Detected: Lower than State Action Level (SAL)
(PFHxA) PFhexanoic acid
2.3ng/L
None
PFAS Detected: Lower than State Action Level (SAL)
(PFBA) PFbutanoic acid
2.6ng/L
None
PFAS Detected: Lower than State Action Level (SAL)
4/4/2023
(PFOS) PFoctane sulfonic acid
6.2ng/L
15ng/L
PFAS Detected: Lower than State Action Level (SAL)
(PFBS) PFbutane sulfonic acid
3.1ng/L
345ng/L
PFAS Detected: Lower than State Action Level (SAL)
Well 13
(Turned off since 10/10/23)
168/5/2022(PFOS) PFoctane sulfonic acid
25ng/L
15ng/L
PFAS Detected: At or Exceeding State Action Level (SAL)
(PFOA) PFoctanoic acid
3.9ng/L
10ng/L
PFAS Detected: Lower than State Action Level (SAL)
(PFBS) PFbutane sulfonic acid
2.1ng/L
345ng/L
PFAS Detected: Lower than State Action Level (SAL)
3/23/2023(PFOS) PFoctane sulfonic acid
3.8ng/L
15ng/L
PFAS Detected: Lower than State Action Level (SAL)
6/8/2023(PFOS) PFoctane sulfonic acid
8.84ng/L
15ng/l
PFAS Detected: Lower than State Action Level (SAL)
6/13/2023(PFOS) PFoctane sulfonic acid
9.76ng/L
15ng/L
PFAS Detected: Lower than State Action Level (SAL)
(PFOA) PFoctanoic acid
2.23ng/L
10ng/L
PFAS Detected: Lower than State Action Level (SAL)
6/22/2023(PFOS) PFoctane sulfonic acid
10.5ng/L
15ng/L
PFAS Detected: Lower than State Action Level (SAL)
(PFOA) PFoctanoic acid
2.13ng/L
10ng/L
PFAS Detected: Lower than State Action Level (SAL)
7/13/2023(PFOS) PFoctane sulfonic acid
15.8ng/L
15ng/L
PFAS Detected: At or Exceeding State Action Level (SAL)
(PFOA) PFoctanoic acid
4.27ng/L
10ng/L
PFAS Detected: Lower than State Action Level (SAL)
(PFBS) PFbutane sulfonic acid
2.1ng/L
345ng/L
PFAS Detected: Lower than State Action Level (SAL)
12/5/2022(PFOS) PFoctane sulfonic acid
17ng/L
15ng/L
PFAS Detected: At or Exceeding State Action Level (SAL)
(PFOA) PFoctanoic acid
3.3
10ng/L
PFAS Detected: Lower than State Action Level (SAL)
10/31/2023(PFBS) PFbutane sulfonic acid
3.8 ng/L

345ng/L

PFAS Detected: Lower than State Action Level (SAL)
(PFOA) PFoctanoic acid
4.4ng/L

10ng/L

PFAS Detected: Lower than State Action Level (SAL)
(PFOS) PFoctane sulfonic acid

12ng/L15ng/L

PFAS Detected: Lower than State Action Level (SAL)
12/5/2023(PFOS) PFoctane sulfonic acid
7ng/L
15ng/L
PFAS Detected: Lower than State Action Level (SAL)
(PFOA) PFoctanoic acid
2.8 ng/L
10ng/L
PFAS Detected: Lower than State Action Level (SAL)
(PFBS) PFbutane sulfonic acid
2.6 ng/L
345ng/L
PFAS Detected: Lower than State Action Level (SAL)
4/4/24(PFOS) PFoctane sulfonic acid
3.5ng/l15ng/L
PFAS Detected: Lower than State Action Level (SAL)
Well 14
(In general use)
177/13/2023(PFOS) PFoctane sulfonic acid
4.18ng/L
15ng/L
PFAS Detected: Lower than State Action Level (SAL)
(PFOA) PFoctanoic acid
3.19ng/L
10ng/L
PFAS Detected: Lower than State Action Level (SAL)
(PFBS) PFbutane sulfonic acid
2.35ng/L
345ng/L
PFAS Detected: Lower than State Action Level (SAL)
"Well Field East"
(In general use - Sampling location is after blending of Wells 6 and 14)
183/22/2022
(PFOS) PFoctane sulfonic acid
3.3ng/L
15ng/L
PFAS Detected: Lower than State Action Level (SAL)
11/9/2022
(PFOS) PFoctane sulfonic acid
4.6ng/L
15ng/L
PFAS Detected: Lower than State Action Level (SAL)
(PFOA) PFoctanoic acid
2.4ng/L
10ng/L
PFAS Detected: Lower than State Action Level (SAL)
(PFBS) PFbutane sulfonic acid

2.4ng/L

345ng/L

PFAS Detected: Lower than State Action Level (SAL)
9/27/2023(PFOS) PFoctane sulfonic acid
5.9ng/L
15ng/L
PFAS Detected: Lower than State Action Level (SAL)
(PFOA) PFoctanoic acid
3.8ng/L
10ng/L
PFAS Detected: Lower than State Action Level (SAL)
(PFBS) PFbutane sulfonic acid
2.0ng/L
345ng/L
PFAS Detected: Lower than State Action Level (SAL)
"Oak Park Well Field"
(In general use - Sampling Location is after blending of Wells 7, 8, 10, 11, and 12)
193/22/2022
(PFOS) PFoctane sulfonic acid
3.1ng/L
15ng/L
PFAS Detected: Lower than State Action Level (SAL)
11/9/2022
(PFOS) PFoctane sulfonic acid
4.2ng/L
15ng/L
PFAS Detected: Lower than State Action Level (SAL)
(PFOA) PFoctanoic acid
2.2ng/L
10ng/L
PFAS Detected: Lower than State Action Level (SAL)
4/4/2023
(PFOS) PFoctane sulfonic acid
4.2ng/L
15ng/L
PFAS Detected: Lower than State Action Level (SAL)
7/13/2023
(PFOS) PFoctane sulfonic acid
3.69ng/L
15ng/L
PFAS Detected: Lower than State Action Level (SAL)
(PFOA) PFoctanoic acid
2.28ng/L
10ng/L
PFAS Detected: Lower than State Action Level (SAL)
9/27/23(PFOS) PFoctane sulfonic acid
3.4ng/L
15ng/L

PFAS Detected: Lower than State Action Level (SAL)
(PFOA) PFoctanoic acid
1.0ng/L
10ng/L
PFAS Detected: Lower than State Action Level (SAL)
5711 SE Strong Road (Crown Road Booster Station)
System Test8/23/2023
(PFOS) PFoctane sulfonic acid
2.69ng/L
15ng/L
PFAS Detected: Lower than State Action Level (SAL)
27200 Robinson Road
System Test
9/11/2023
(PFOS) PFoctane sulfonic acid
3.0ng/L
15ng/L
PFAS Detected: Lower than State Action Level (SAL)
Deer Haven
System Test

9/11/2023
(PFOS) PFoctane sulfonic acid
13.7ng/L
15ng/L

PFAS Detected: Lower than State Action Level (SAL)
9/11/2023
(PFOA) PFoctanoic acid
3.9ng/L
10ng/L

PFAS Detected: Lower than State Action Level (SAL)
Crown Park
System Test

9/11/2023

(PFOS) PFoctane sulfonic acid

11.5ng/L


15ng/L


PFAS Detected: Lower than State Action Level (SAL)
9/11/2023

(PFOA) PFoctanoic acid

3.11ng/L
10ng/L


PFAS Detected: Lower than State Action Level (SAL)
NE Sitka Dr
System Test


9/11/2023
(PFOS) PFoctane sulfonic acid

2.8ng/L
15ng/L
PFAS Detected: Lower than State Action Level (SAL)
NW Woodburn Drive
System Test



10/5/2023
(PFOS) PFoctane sulfonic acid
9.88ng/L
15ng/L

PFAS Detected: Lower than State Action Level (SAL)
10/5/2023
(PFOA) PFoctanoic acid

2.03ng/L
10ng/L
PFAS Detected: Lower than State Action Level (SAL)
1620 SE 8th Ave
System Test
10/5/2023
(PFOS) PFoctane sulfonic acid
14.4ng/L
15ng/L
PFAS Detected: Lower than State Action Level (SAL)
10/5/2023
(PFOA) PFoctanoic acid
2.69ng/L
10ng/L
PFAS Detected: Lower than State Action Level (SAL)
2822 NW 18th Ave
System Test
10/5/2023
(PFOS) PFoctane sulfonic acid
12.1ng/L
15ng/L
PFAS Detected: Lower than State Action Level (SAL)
10/5/2023
(PFOA) PFoctanoic acid
2.81ng/L
10ng/L
PFAS Detected: Lower than State Action Level (SAL)
North Chestnut St
System Test
10/5/2023
(PFOS) PFoctane sulfonic acid
4.64ng/L
15ng/L

PFAS Detected: Lower than State Action Level (SAL)
4542 NW Rae Ct
System Test
10/5/2023
(PFOS) PFoctane sulfonic acid
11.5ng/L
15ng/L
PFAS Detected: Lower than State Action Level (SAL)
10/5/2023
(PFOA) PFoctanoic acid
2.38ng/L
10ng/L
PFAS Detected: Lower than State Action Level (SAL)
Stone Leaf
System Test
10/5/2023
NDNDNDND


Well Locations:


**Update 5/21/24**

Information for Drinking Water Customers Regarding the City’s PFAS Response

This information is being provided to City of Camas, WA water system customers to inform you of the City’s ongoing response to per- and polyfluoroalkyl substances (PFAS) within portions of the City’s groundwater sources (i.e. wells).

Status of Well 13

In accordance with the Washington State Department of Health (DOH) requirements the City first notified customers in January of 2023 that one of the City’s ten well sources, Well 13, had PFAS detections that were slightly above the “State Action Level” (SAL). There was an average detection level of 15.8ppt and the SAL is 15 ppt. Since that time, the City has provided multiple notices to the public through various sources that Well 13 has been used seasonally as needed to meet water demands. Most recently, a social media/website announcement was made that Well 13 was turned on again on May 15th as a cautionary measure after two of the City’s other wells had to be taken offline for mechanical service. The two wells are being repaired as quickly as possible, and in the meantime, Well 13 will only be used if the water demands get high enough that the City’s other remaining wells are not able to keep up. However, with the summer months nearly here, we also want our customers to understand that Well 13 will remain on and likely be used as a regular water source from June 1 through Fall 2024 when demands are less, at which time it would be turned off again through the winter.

You can help! Reducing your irrigation use to every other day (e.g. odd/even based on the last number of your address), or using native plantings and not irrigating at all, can minimize the need for the use of Well 13.

City’s PFAS Response Plan & New EPA Rule

In 2021, the Washington State Board of Health (SBOH) adopted a rule that required water system utilities, including the City of Camas, to test for PFAS. PFAS are a newer class of contaminants, that at the time, were not regulated by the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA). As discussed above, the rule also requires the City to notify you if any test results exceed the SAL.

The City has taken the PFAS concern seriously and continues to be proactive in our approach to the water system. After volunteering in late 2020 to test our water system for PFAS prior to most other providers in the State, the City has been actively researching, sampling, monitoring and reviewing options with the City Council to help address PFAS within the City’s system on both a near-term and long-term basis. Most immediately, the City is currently designing treatment system improvements for Well 13, which will likely include the use of either granular activated carbon or ion exchange treatment media. Treatment for Well 13 is anticipated to be online in late 2025, and based on early estimates is anticipated to cost approximately $6,500,000.

In addition to designing treatment for Well 13, the City’s team of experts are also assisting the City with completion of a comprehensive PFAS response management plan which will include a comprehensive review of the City’s well sources and identification of all potential funding resources for future treatment or new water sources. We received some additional help towards this effort in April when the Nation finally received certainty regarding our target PFAS treatment levels from the EPA.

Exposure to PFAS occurs in various ways, including through drinking water. Because of the widespread use of PFAS in manufacturing, it has become a world-wide issue and one that until very recently, even the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) or Safe Water Drinking Act did not address or provide guidance for the States or water providers to follow. On April 10, 2024, EPA announced their final National Primary Drinking Water Regulation (NPDWR) for six specific PFAS. This included development of a Maximum Contaminant Level (MCL) for PFOA, PFAS, PFHxS HFPO-DA and PFBS. EPA also finalized health-based, non-enforceable Maximum Contaminant Level Goals (MCLGs) for these same PFAS. The regulated MCLs and MCLGs are shown in the table below.

The final PFAS NPDWR Rule requires:

  • Public water systems must monitor for these PFAS and have three years to complete initial monitoring (by 2027), followed by ongoing compliance monitoring. Water systems must also provide the public with information on the levels of these PFAS in their drinking water beginning in 2027.
  • Public water systems have five years (by 2029) to implement solutions that reduce these PFAS if monitoring shows that drinking water levels exceed these MCLs.
  • Beginning in five years (2029), public water systems that have PFAS in drinking water which violates one or more of these MCLs must take action to reduce levels of these PFAS in their drinking water and must provide notification to the public of the violation.

The NPDWR provides States an additional 2 years to create and adopt individual state regulations to be in compliance with the NPDWR. It is expected that DOH will adopt similar levels to EPA for utilities in Washington State. The City’s monitoring completed in 2021 and 2022 should count towards meeting the requirements in the first bullet and we are already moving on treatment options for Well 13. Even though the City’s other sources have been testing below the State Action Level of 15 ppt; unfortunately, based on prior PFOS test results greater than 4.0 ppt it appears that other City wells may now need additional monitoring under EPAs MCL. As such, as part of the City’s response management plan we will be monitoring all wells and investigating further to determine if additional treatment or alternative sources are needed to meet the new MCL.

This is of the highest priority for the City’s water system, and we are working as quickly as possible to get treatment in place and have a solid response management plan as a roadmap for the future.

The standards established by EPA are set to reduce PFAS to the lowest levels that are feasible for effective implementation. If you are concerned about the level of PFAS in your drinking water, consider installing an in-home water treatment (e.g., filters) that are certified to lower the levels of PFAS in your water. For more information: https://www.epa.gov/system/files/documents/2024-04/water-filter-fact-sheet.pdf

For fact sheets and more information on the new EPA National Primary Drinking Water regulation related to PFAS, please visit: https://www.epa.gov/sdwa/and-polyfluoroalkyl-substances-pfas

For more information related to the City’s water system and PFAS, please visit https://engagecamas.com/pfas-and-the-camas-water-system or contact Rob Charles, Utilities Manager (360-817-7003 or rcharles@cityofcamas.us) or Steve Wall, Public Works Director (360-817-7899 or swall@cityofcamas.us). Please do not hesitate to share this notice with others who may drink this water, especially those who may not have received this notice directly (for example, people in apartments and businesses).

We have also completed the 2023 Consumer Confidence Report, which you can find here: https://engagecamas.com/21559/widgets/70670/documents/55218

**Update 4/12/24**

You may or may not have heard the recent news regarding the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) publishing their new rules on Per- and Polyfluoroalkyl Substances (PFAS) levels in drinking water. The rule, established under the Safe Drinking Water Act, will help reduce exposure to PFAS for approximately 100 million people nationwide. However, it is widely recognized the new rule and regulations will pose a significant challenge to water providers.

The good news is that the City of Camas has been preparing for this ruling, and feel we are as prepared as possible, given the dynamics of the PFAS conversation at a state and national level. We have a team in place, we have solid sampling and monitoring results, we’re just beginning work on development of a management plan, we’re getting a better handle on potential funding resources – and we finally have certainty regarding our target treatment levels and what EPA deems to be “safe drinking water.”

We will provide more information as the State, our regional partners and staff begin to understand the ruling better. We’ll also be working to get an initial notice out to the public that reiterates where Camas is at in our overall process and where we’re headed. In the meantime, please visit these links to learn more information about the recent EPA Ruling. https://www.epa.gov/newsreleases/biden-harris-administration-finalizes-first-ever-national-drinking-water-standard https://doh.wa.gov/newsroom/washington-state-will-move-forward-adopt-us-environmental-protection-agencys-new-federal-regulation

**Updated 12/27/23**

Water System Plan (WSP) Amendment for PFAS - The City is in the process of amending the WSP to add language about PFAS testing requirements by the Washington State Department of Health (DOH) and EPA for sources that test above the State Action Level (SAL) and proposed EPA Maximum Contaminant Level (MCL). A high-level risk assessment and PFAS screening to guide the City on immediate and near term mitigation actions for reducing PFAS from well sources will be included. Mitigation measures will include treatment options and capital and operations and maintenance costs for impacted sources. The amendment will allow the City to apply for state and federal grants related to PFAS design and construction.

PFAS Evaluation and Well 13 Treatment Design - The City is in the process of selecting a consultant team to complete a more in-depth risk assessment for the City’s water sources and look at possible sources of PFAS contamination in the city’s groundwater supply. The assessment will aid the City in determining potential mitigation measures including options such as treatment of current sources or the potential need to look for new water sources in different areas. Also included in this effort will be design of a treatment system specifically for Well 13 that can be used to obtain contractor bids to construct the project. The City expects the consultant team to be on board by February 2024 and the City is requesting that the selected team move as fast as possible in completing the work.

PFAS Lawsuit Information - Various PFAS manufacturers were sued in a class-action lawsuit brought on behalf of water systems across the Country. Recently, the federal court in South Carolina, where the cases and settlements are being handled, approved multi-billion dollar settlements involving two of the largest producers of PFAS chemicals: 3M and DuPont. These settlements resolve claims for PFAS contamination specifically against 3M and Dupont in water systems, but there may be additional settlements against other producers in the future. The 3M and Dupont settlements are structured so that every eligible water system in the Country is automatically included as a “class member” in the case unless the water system submits a formal “opt out” request to the court. In 2023, the City of Camas elected to be represented by one of the primary legal firms litigating the case and participating in the settlement negotiations and has continued to maintain our status of a Class Member. Some of the additional testing and monitoring shown on our EngageCamas site was completed in coordination with the class-action lawsuit. The level of PFAS in Camas’ water system is extremely low compared to many other systems throughout the Country, which will likely mean our share of the overall settlement will be relatively less; however, we expect the funds from the settlement will be a sizable contribution towards future PFAS treatment needs.

**Updated 10/10/23**

Well 13 has now been shut off for the season. We will inform the public if/when Well 13 is active once again.

FAQ -Is our water safe to drink and bathe in?

The low levels of PFAS found in our water supply are slightly above recommended limits in state and federal guidance. According to DOH, if you have been drinking water with PFAS above a state action level (SAL), that does not mean you will get sick or have health problems. If you are concerned about potential health impacts from exposure to PFAS, please contact your health provider. Because the water supply at each home is a combination of water from a variety of wells, we are currently unable to provide information on which areas of the City may have detectable levels of PFAS in your tap water. However, the City is completing additional testing throughout the system and will continue to update our information page with test results so you are able to make informed decisions. Please feel free to check back regularly. For more FAQs please visit https://engagecamas.com/21559/widgets/70670/documents/46966

PFAS and the Camas Water Supply

The City has been working hard to stay on top of the emerging and technically complex perfluoroalkyl substances (PFAS) contamination issue. We have been listening to the public’s input and questions and want to assure everyone that providing safe and effective services – of all types - to our customers is our highest priority.

Many of us at the City live in this community and use the same source of water every day. We’re aware this is an uncomfortable topic for many as there is still a lot that is unknown by the experts. Resident health is paramount, and we are being proactive on this topic. We’re working to understand both the current situation that recent State regulations and testing of the system have brought to light, and any potential future impacts to our water.

PFAS in general, and the potential impacts to water sources is an ever-evolving discussion. Additionally, as with every project or expense the City takes on, we want to take prudent, measured actions that use your money wisely, while also working to leverage state and Federal sources when possible.

We have provided an FAQ, which we will update periodically, to help answer some of the questions you may have. In addition, we have provided links to outside sources that have more information on PFAS. Finally, you can ask us questions below. Please note, it may take staff a few business days to respond, but we will respond! Additionally, some questions may be answered in private depending on the nature of the question and whether or not a similar response has already been provided in regards to another question!

Current Progress:

Evaluating Options. We continue talking with Department of Health officials and experts in the industry to review potential treatment options. Likewise, we continue evaluating the potential need for additional or different sources and ways to potentially limit the amount of water with known PFAS concentrations that is sent to our customers.

Tracking Nation-Wide Discussions. PFAS is an extremely complex and ever-evolving topic. Experts around the Nation and world continue investigating potential sources of PFAS and potential impacts to public health and the environment. Additionally, the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) is still deliberating on a potential new Nation-wide rule that will set new standards for PFAS in drinking water - it is vital we understand and monitor this closely as we look to the future!

Using the Public's Funds Wisely. The City is tracking potential State and Federal Grant opportunities to assist with the PFAS process. The City also has legal representation to assist with the many potential settlements against the companies that manufacture and used PFAS in their products that have since impacted water sources throughout the world.

Sampling and Monitoring the System. We are working hard to determine the extent of PFAS in the Water System! Testing is ongoing not only at our Well Sites, but also throughout the City to determine the extent of PFAS that may or may not be reaching our customers. See below for the most up to date information regarding testing and results.

*Please note, the City tests for numerous Perfluorinated Compounds that fall under PFAS, we will only show results that are detectable.








City Well No.
DOH Source No.Testing Date
PFAS Measured
Result
State Action Level (SAL)
Result
Well 5
(Last used August 2022)
063/22/2022(PFOS) PFoctane Sulfonic acid 6.9ng/L15ng/L
PFAS Detected: Lower than State Action Level (SAL)
(PFOA) PFoctanoic acid
3.6ng/L
10ng/L
PFAS Detected: Lower than State Action Level (SAL)
(PFBS) PFbutane Sulfonic acid
3.7ng/L
345ng/L
PFAS Detected: Lower than State Action Level (SAL)
8/5/2022
(PFOS) PFoctane sulfonic acid
7.3ng/L
15ng/L
PFAS Detected: Lower than State Action Level (SAL)
(PFOA) PFoctanoic acid
5.4ng/L
10ng/L
PFAS Detected: Lower than State Action Level (SAL)
(PFBS) PFbutane sulfonic acid
3.5ng/L
345ng/L
PFAS Detected: Lower than State Action Level (SAL)
(PFBA) PFbutanoic acid
2.2ng/L
None
PFAS Detected: Lower than State Action Level (SAL)
11/9/2022(PFBA) PFbutanoic acid
6.9ng/L
15ng/L
PFAS Detected: Lower than State Action Level (SAL)
(PFOA) PFoctanoic acid
5.3ng/L
10ng/L
PFAS Detected: Lower than State Action Level (SAL)
(PFBS) PFbutane sulfonic acid
3.9ng/L
345ng/L
PFAS Detected: Lower than State Action Level (SAL)
(PFPeA) PFpentanoic acid
2.7ng/L
None
PFAS Detected: Lower than State Action Level (SAL)
(PFHxA) PFhexanoic acid
2.3ng/L
None
PFAS Detected: Lower than State Action Level (SAL)
(PFBA) PFbutanoic acid
2.6ng/L
None
PFAS Detected: Lower than State Action Level (SAL)
4/4/2023
(PFOS) PFoctane sulfonic acid
6.2ng/L
15ng/L
PFAS Detected: Lower than State Action Level (SAL)
(PFBS) PFbutane sulfonic acid
3.1ng/L
345ng/L
PFAS Detected: Lower than State Action Level (SAL)
Well 13
(Turned off since 10/10/23)
168/5/2022(PFOS) PFoctane sulfonic acid
25ng/L
15ng/L
PFAS Detected: At or Exceeding State Action Level (SAL)
(PFOA) PFoctanoic acid
3.9ng/L
10ng/L
PFAS Detected: Lower than State Action Level (SAL)
(PFBS) PFbutane sulfonic acid
2.1ng/L
345ng/L
PFAS Detected: Lower than State Action Level (SAL)
3/23/2023(PFOS) PFoctane sulfonic acid
3.8ng/L
15ng/L
PFAS Detected: Lower than State Action Level (SAL)
6/8/2023(PFOS) PFoctane sulfonic acid
8.84ng/L
15ng/l
PFAS Detected: Lower than State Action Level (SAL)
6/13/2023(PFOS) PFoctane sulfonic acid
9.76ng/L
15ng/L
PFAS Detected: Lower than State Action Level (SAL)
(PFOA) PFoctanoic acid
2.23ng/L
10ng/L
PFAS Detected: Lower than State Action Level (SAL)
6/22/2023(PFOS) PFoctane sulfonic acid
10.5ng/L
15ng/L
PFAS Detected: Lower than State Action Level (SAL)
(PFOA) PFoctanoic acid
2.13ng/L
10ng/L
PFAS Detected: Lower than State Action Level (SAL)
7/13/2023(PFOS) PFoctane sulfonic acid
15.8ng/L
15ng/L
PFAS Detected: At or Exceeding State Action Level (SAL)
(PFOA) PFoctanoic acid
4.27ng/L
10ng/L
PFAS Detected: Lower than State Action Level (SAL)
(PFBS) PFbutane sulfonic acid
2.1ng/L
345ng/L
PFAS Detected: Lower than State Action Level (SAL)
12/5/2022(PFOS) PFoctane sulfonic acid
17ng/L
15ng/L
PFAS Detected: At or Exceeding State Action Level (SAL)
(PFOA) PFoctanoic acid
3.3
10ng/L
PFAS Detected: Lower than State Action Level (SAL)
10/31/2023(PFBS) PFbutane sulfonic acid
3.8 ng/L

345ng/L

PFAS Detected: Lower than State Action Level (SAL)
(PFOA) PFoctanoic acid
4.4ng/L

10ng/L

PFAS Detected: Lower than State Action Level (SAL)
(PFOS) PFoctane sulfonic acid

12ng/L15ng/L

PFAS Detected: Lower than State Action Level (SAL)
12/5/2023(PFOS) PFoctane sulfonic acid
7ng/L
15ng/L
PFAS Detected: Lower than State Action Level (SAL)
(PFOA) PFoctanoic acid
2.8 ng/L
10ng/L
PFAS Detected: Lower than State Action Level (SAL)
(PFBS) PFbutane sulfonic acid
2.6 ng/L
345ng/L
PFAS Detected: Lower than State Action Level (SAL)
4/4/24(PFOS) PFoctane sulfonic acid
3.5ng/l15ng/L
PFAS Detected: Lower than State Action Level (SAL)
Well 14
(In general use)
177/13/2023(PFOS) PFoctane sulfonic acid
4.18ng/L
15ng/L
PFAS Detected: Lower than State Action Level (SAL)
(PFOA) PFoctanoic acid
3.19ng/L
10ng/L
PFAS Detected: Lower than State Action Level (SAL)
(PFBS) PFbutane sulfonic acid
2.35ng/L
345ng/L
PFAS Detected: Lower than State Action Level (SAL)
"Well Field East"
(In general use - Sampling location is after blending of Wells 6 and 14)
183/22/2022
(PFOS) PFoctane sulfonic acid
3.3ng/L
15ng/L
PFAS Detected: Lower than State Action Level (SAL)
11/9/2022
(PFOS) PFoctane sulfonic acid
4.6ng/L
15ng/L
PFAS Detected: Lower than State Action Level (SAL)
(PFOA) PFoctanoic acid
2.4ng/L
10ng/L
PFAS Detected: Lower than State Action Level (SAL)
(PFBS) PFbutane sulfonic acid

2.4ng/L

345ng/L

PFAS Detected: Lower than State Action Level (SAL)
9/27/2023(PFOS) PFoctane sulfonic acid
5.9ng/L
15ng/L
PFAS Detected: Lower than State Action Level (SAL)
(PFOA) PFoctanoic acid
3.8ng/L
10ng/L
PFAS Detected: Lower than State Action Level (SAL)
(PFBS) PFbutane sulfonic acid
2.0ng/L
345ng/L
PFAS Detected: Lower than State Action Level (SAL)
"Oak Park Well Field"
(In general use - Sampling Location is after blending of Wells 7, 8, 10, 11, and 12)
193/22/2022
(PFOS) PFoctane sulfonic acid
3.1ng/L
15ng/L
PFAS Detected: Lower than State Action Level (SAL)
11/9/2022
(PFOS) PFoctane sulfonic acid
4.2ng/L
15ng/L
PFAS Detected: Lower than State Action Level (SAL)
(PFOA) PFoctanoic acid
2.2ng/L
10ng/L
PFAS Detected: Lower than State Action Level (SAL)
4/4/2023
(PFOS) PFoctane sulfonic acid
4.2ng/L
15ng/L
PFAS Detected: Lower than State Action Level (SAL)
7/13/2023
(PFOS) PFoctane sulfonic acid
3.69ng/L
15ng/L
PFAS Detected: Lower than State Action Level (SAL)
(PFOA) PFoctanoic acid
2.28ng/L
10ng/L
PFAS Detected: Lower than State Action Level (SAL)
9/27/23(PFOS) PFoctane sulfonic acid
3.4ng/L
15ng/L

PFAS Detected: Lower than State Action Level (SAL)
(PFOA) PFoctanoic acid
1.0ng/L
10ng/L
PFAS Detected: Lower than State Action Level (SAL)
5711 SE Strong Road (Crown Road Booster Station)
System Test8/23/2023
(PFOS) PFoctane sulfonic acid
2.69ng/L
15ng/L
PFAS Detected: Lower than State Action Level (SAL)
27200 Robinson Road
System Test
9/11/2023
(PFOS) PFoctane sulfonic acid
3.0ng/L
15ng/L
PFAS Detected: Lower than State Action Level (SAL)
Deer Haven
System Test

9/11/2023
(PFOS) PFoctane sulfonic acid
13.7ng/L
15ng/L

PFAS Detected: Lower than State Action Level (SAL)
9/11/2023
(PFOA) PFoctanoic acid
3.9ng/L
10ng/L

PFAS Detected: Lower than State Action Level (SAL)
Crown Park
System Test

9/11/2023

(PFOS) PFoctane sulfonic acid

11.5ng/L


15ng/L


PFAS Detected: Lower than State Action Level (SAL)
9/11/2023

(PFOA) PFoctanoic acid

3.11ng/L
10ng/L


PFAS Detected: Lower than State Action Level (SAL)
NE Sitka Dr
System Test


9/11/2023
(PFOS) PFoctane sulfonic acid

2.8ng/L
15ng/L
PFAS Detected: Lower than State Action Level (SAL)
NW Woodburn Drive
System Test



10/5/2023
(PFOS) PFoctane sulfonic acid
9.88ng/L
15ng/L

PFAS Detected: Lower than State Action Level (SAL)
10/5/2023
(PFOA) PFoctanoic acid

2.03ng/L
10ng/L
PFAS Detected: Lower than State Action Level (SAL)
1620 SE 8th Ave
System Test
10/5/2023
(PFOS) PFoctane sulfonic acid
14.4ng/L
15ng/L
PFAS Detected: Lower than State Action Level (SAL)
10/5/2023
(PFOA) PFoctanoic acid
2.69ng/L
10ng/L
PFAS Detected: Lower than State Action Level (SAL)
2822 NW 18th Ave
System Test
10/5/2023
(PFOS) PFoctane sulfonic acid
12.1ng/L
15ng/L
PFAS Detected: Lower than State Action Level (SAL)
10/5/2023
(PFOA) PFoctanoic acid
2.81ng/L
10ng/L
PFAS Detected: Lower than State Action Level (SAL)
North Chestnut St
System Test
10/5/2023
(PFOS) PFoctane sulfonic acid
4.64ng/L
15ng/L

PFAS Detected: Lower than State Action Level (SAL)
4542 NW Rae Ct
System Test
10/5/2023
(PFOS) PFoctane sulfonic acid
11.5ng/L
15ng/L
PFAS Detected: Lower than State Action Level (SAL)
10/5/2023
(PFOA) PFoctanoic acid
2.38ng/L
10ng/L
PFAS Detected: Lower than State Action Level (SAL)
Stone Leaf
System Test
10/5/2023
NDNDNDND


Well Locations:


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  • Share When do you expect to issue a Clean Water report (Consumer Confidence report) for the year 2023? Also is there any new PFAS data to report? on Facebook Share When do you expect to issue a Clean Water report (Consumer Confidence report) for the year 2023? Also is there any new PFAS data to report? on Twitter Share When do you expect to issue a Clean Water report (Consumer Confidence report) for the year 2023? Also is there any new PFAS data to report? on Linkedin Email When do you expect to issue a Clean Water report (Consumer Confidence report) for the year 2023? Also is there any new PFAS data to report? link

    When do you expect to issue a Clean Water report (Consumer Confidence report) for the year 2023? Also is there any new PFAS data to report?

    Basstalker asked about 2 months ago

    Thank you for using Engage Camas and thank you for your questions. The CCR is due in July each year, and we usually try to make it available by June. Please note, we will post it to this site once it's complete. In terms of testing, the most recent test for 2024 were conducted in March. We're awaiting the results and will post as soon as we receive those. 

  • Share Has the City of Camas developed a risk management plan that addresses the following circumstances - 1) Compromise of well 13 and inability to use this for repeated tests above the PFAS SAL? 2) Compromise of any other well/wellfield with tests above the PFAS SAL? 3) Treatment options (either individual wells or groups of wells in a wellfield) to safely deliver water from ANYWHERE in the system? 4) Funding increases to ratepayers vs grants or low interest revolving funds? 5) Vulnerability to potential contaminants of concern from any potential discharges (air, soil, or water/groundwater) within a mile of any supply wells? on Facebook Share Has the City of Camas developed a risk management plan that addresses the following circumstances - 1) Compromise of well 13 and inability to use this for repeated tests above the PFAS SAL? 2) Compromise of any other well/wellfield with tests above the PFAS SAL? 3) Treatment options (either individual wells or groups of wells in a wellfield) to safely deliver water from ANYWHERE in the system? 4) Funding increases to ratepayers vs grants or low interest revolving funds? 5) Vulnerability to potential contaminants of concern from any potential discharges (air, soil, or water/groundwater) within a mile of any supply wells? on Twitter Share Has the City of Camas developed a risk management plan that addresses the following circumstances - 1) Compromise of well 13 and inability to use this for repeated tests above the PFAS SAL? 2) Compromise of any other well/wellfield with tests above the PFAS SAL? 3) Treatment options (either individual wells or groups of wells in a wellfield) to safely deliver water from ANYWHERE in the system? 4) Funding increases to ratepayers vs grants or low interest revolving funds? 5) Vulnerability to potential contaminants of concern from any potential discharges (air, soil, or water/groundwater) within a mile of any supply wells? on Linkedin Email Has the City of Camas developed a risk management plan that addresses the following circumstances - 1) Compromise of well 13 and inability to use this for repeated tests above the PFAS SAL? 2) Compromise of any other well/wellfield with tests above the PFAS SAL? 3) Treatment options (either individual wells or groups of wells in a wellfield) to safely deliver water from ANYWHERE in the system? 4) Funding increases to ratepayers vs grants or low interest revolving funds? 5) Vulnerability to potential contaminants of concern from any potential discharges (air, soil, or water/groundwater) within a mile of any supply wells? link

    Has the City of Camas developed a risk management plan that addresses the following circumstances - 1) Compromise of well 13 and inability to use this for repeated tests above the PFAS SAL? 2) Compromise of any other well/wellfield with tests above the PFAS SAL? 3) Treatment options (either individual wells or groups of wells in a wellfield) to safely deliver water from ANYWHERE in the system? 4) Funding increases to ratepayers vs grants or low interest revolving funds? 5) Vulnerability to potential contaminants of concern from any potential discharges (air, soil, or water/groundwater) within a mile of any supply wells?

    Soldier76 asked 8 months ago

    Thank you for using Engage Camas. All of these items have been, and are being, reviewed in one form or another through staff and current on-call consultants (hydrogeologists). In addition to current staff and on-call consultants, the City has also began the process of bringing on a larger team to review the potential effects of the PFAS on the system that we’ve seen to date, complete further investigation, develop options for treatment, help track EPA rulemaking, etc. Since being made aware of the PFAS in the water system, the City has been primarily focused on trying to determine the extent of PFAS in our groundwater sources (wells) and throughout the system as that is the most pressing issue. Though there is no immediate apparent contaminate area around the wells, more specifically around Well 13 which has PFAS levels above the State Action Level, the City has also began a process to monitor areas around Well 13 to determine the extent of the PFAS plume in the groundwater. It’s anticipated that additional investigation will occur around not only Well 13, but also around the Lower Washougal River Wellfield once we have additional consultant resources available. As discussed above, to date, the City has been using staff and our on-call hydrogeologists to monitor EPAs proposed rulemaking and has begun the process of bringing on a larger team to review the potential effects of the PFAS on the system that we’ve seen to date, complete further investigation, develop options for treatment, help track EPA rulemaking, etc. 

  • Share What is Camas doing to fix this problem? This should be the most important issue facing Camas. Not roundabouts, housing or any other issue. The photos are not expanded, where is well 13? on Facebook Share What is Camas doing to fix this problem? This should be the most important issue facing Camas. Not roundabouts, housing or any other issue. The photos are not expanded, where is well 13? on Twitter Share What is Camas doing to fix this problem? This should be the most important issue facing Camas. Not roundabouts, housing or any other issue. The photos are not expanded, where is well 13? on Linkedin Email What is Camas doing to fix this problem? This should be the most important issue facing Camas. Not roundabouts, housing or any other issue. The photos are not expanded, where is well 13? link

    What is Camas doing to fix this problem? This should be the most important issue facing Camas. Not roundabouts, housing or any other issue. The photos are not expanded, where is well 13?

    Dhinesley asked 8 months ago

    Thank you for using Engage Camas and sorry for the delayed reply. Well 13 is located on Cramer Lane off of 1st Avenue to the southeast of Louis Bloch Park. The City continues to put significant resources towards this topic to determine the best path forward for the community. Please continue to check back to the Engage Camas site for updated information. 

  • Share Hello everyone, we are Retired and my disabled Veteran husband and I are Worried. We are on Camas Water. We're always careful about using water and our bills are already high. We pay for our home water and I have to buy water from outside sources now which is also heavy for us to carry. Sadly Thinking of how to buy a house filter and is there something you can do for us. Will you give us some compensation for this. We would be going into Credit card debt for the filter. We have been using the Refrigerator filter but it doesn't filter everything. Thank you for your help sincerely Christina. on Facebook Share Hello everyone, we are Retired and my disabled Veteran husband and I are Worried. We are on Camas Water. We're always careful about using water and our bills are already high. We pay for our home water and I have to buy water from outside sources now which is also heavy for us to carry. Sadly Thinking of how to buy a house filter and is there something you can do for us. Will you give us some compensation for this. We would be going into Credit card debt for the filter. We have been using the Refrigerator filter but it doesn't filter everything. Thank you for your help sincerely Christina. on Twitter Share Hello everyone, we are Retired and my disabled Veteran husband and I are Worried. We are on Camas Water. We're always careful about using water and our bills are already high. We pay for our home water and I have to buy water from outside sources now which is also heavy for us to carry. Sadly Thinking of how to buy a house filter and is there something you can do for us. Will you give us some compensation for this. We would be going into Credit card debt for the filter. We have been using the Refrigerator filter but it doesn't filter everything. Thank you for your help sincerely Christina. on Linkedin Email Hello everyone, we are Retired and my disabled Veteran husband and I are Worried. We are on Camas Water. We're always careful about using water and our bills are already high. We pay for our home water and I have to buy water from outside sources now which is also heavy for us to carry. Sadly Thinking of how to buy a house filter and is there something you can do for us. Will you give us some compensation for this. We would be going into Credit card debt for the filter. We have been using the Refrigerator filter but it doesn't filter everything. Thank you for your help sincerely Christina. link

    Hello everyone, we are Retired and my disabled Veteran husband and I are Worried. We are on Camas Water. We're always careful about using water and our bills are already high. We pay for our home water and I have to buy water from outside sources now which is also heavy for us to carry. Sadly Thinking of how to buy a house filter and is there something you can do for us. Will you give us some compensation for this. We would be going into Credit card debt for the filter. We have been using the Refrigerator filter but it doesn't filter everything. Thank you for your help sincerely Christina.

    Cabong60 asked 8 months ago

    Thank you for using Engage Camas and sorry for the delayed reply. Thank you for your husband’s service. Unfortunately, the City is not compensating individuals or households for the purchase of filters. PFAS limits are based on long-term health exposures and if you’re concerned about the need to use filtered water, we recommend that you speak with your health care provider. If you decide to use filters in your home, we would also recommend that you use reliable sources like the Environmental Protection Agency or Washington State Department of Health to find products that have been certified to remove PFAS. Links to these pages can be found in the included FAQs on the Engage Camas site. Because this is a world-wide issue, there are also a multitude of reliable scientific agencies that have completed research on available filters and their efficacy in removing PFAS.

  • Share I have 3 questions: 1- why are we still using well 13 when there is a well in use that is testing lower for contaminates that is not in use and we have entered into the fall where water use should be lower? 2- Do different wells supply different areas and if so how do we determine where our home’s water supply comes from? 3- How can you justify providing contaminated water with no clear action plan and then advising your water customers who belong to sensitive groups to drink filtered or bottled water? I would expect a clear action plan as our costs have not gone down and you are not providing the service (clean water) that we are paying for. on Facebook Share I have 3 questions: 1- why are we still using well 13 when there is a well in use that is testing lower for contaminates that is not in use and we have entered into the fall where water use should be lower? 2- Do different wells supply different areas and if so how do we determine where our home’s water supply comes from? 3- How can you justify providing contaminated water with no clear action plan and then advising your water customers who belong to sensitive groups to drink filtered or bottled water? I would expect a clear action plan as our costs have not gone down and you are not providing the service (clean water) that we are paying for. on Twitter Share I have 3 questions: 1- why are we still using well 13 when there is a well in use that is testing lower for contaminates that is not in use and we have entered into the fall where water use should be lower? 2- Do different wells supply different areas and if so how do we determine where our home’s water supply comes from? 3- How can you justify providing contaminated water with no clear action plan and then advising your water customers who belong to sensitive groups to drink filtered or bottled water? I would expect a clear action plan as our costs have not gone down and you are not providing the service (clean water) that we are paying for. on Linkedin Email I have 3 questions: 1- why are we still using well 13 when there is a well in use that is testing lower for contaminates that is not in use and we have entered into the fall where water use should be lower? 2- Do different wells supply different areas and if so how do we determine where our home’s water supply comes from? 3- How can you justify providing contaminated water with no clear action plan and then advising your water customers who belong to sensitive groups to drink filtered or bottled water? I would expect a clear action plan as our costs have not gone down and you are not providing the service (clean water) that we are paying for. link

    I have 3 questions: 1- why are we still using well 13 when there is a well in use that is testing lower for contaminates that is not in use and we have entered into the fall where water use should be lower? 2- Do different wells supply different areas and if so how do we determine where our home’s water supply comes from? 3- How can you justify providing contaminated water with no clear action plan and then advising your water customers who belong to sensitive groups to drink filtered or bottled water? I would expect a clear action plan as our costs have not gone down and you are not providing the service (clean water) that we are paying for.

    Brandi H asked 8 months ago

    Thank you for using Engage Camas and sorry for the delayed response. Well 13 is needed to supply water during high demands as described on the Engage Camas site, but the piping system is also set up to use Well 13 under certain conditions – meaning other wells are not able to get water to, or enough water to, the right places in the City. For reference, Well 13 was also turned off for the winter on October 9, 2023.  Different Wells generally send water different directions through the piping system; however, the water ultimately gets mixed (“blended”) in storage reservoirs and in the piping. As such, we are unable to determine exactly which wells service specific households. If you belong to a sensitive group, we recommend speaking with your health care provider about the potential affects of PFAS in your drinking water. If you decide to use filters in your home, we would also recommend that you use reliable sources like the Environmental Protection Agency or Washington State Department of Health to find products that have been certified to remove PFAS. Links to these pages can be found in the included FAQs on the Engage Camas site. Because this is a world-wide issue, there are also a multitude of reliable scientific agencies that have completed research on available filters and their efficacy in removing PFAS. The City has outlined our steps for moving forward, including additional testing, working with the Department of Health, hiring experts to review and design potential treatment systems, and investigating long-term water supply options. 

  • Share I live near Camas high school. Which well would my household receive water from? Thank you. on Facebook Share I live near Camas high school. Which well would my household receive water from? Thank you. on Twitter Share I live near Camas high school. Which well would my household receive water from? Thank you. on Linkedin Email I live near Camas high school. Which well would my household receive water from? Thank you. link

    I live near Camas high school. Which well would my household receive water from? Thank you.

    Sandy asked 8 months ago

    Thank you for using Engage Camas. It's currently not possible to determine which houses or neighborhoods receive water from specific wells.  

Page last updated: 21 May 2024, 08:25 AM